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Leadership & Organisations

Executive women: Is there a future?

There are plenty of women in the workplace – and in positions only dreamed of a generation ago: airline pilots, scientists, executives. But not TOP executives. In the United States alone, only 14 percent hold the keys to the executive suite, a 2010 report by non-profit group Catalyst reports.

Career

The value of bicultural individuals to organisations

How do companies improve operationally with diverse and talented workforces? By taking advantage of individuals who feel at home in multiple cultures, says INSEAD visiting professor Mary Yoko Brannen.
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Career

How to make friends and gain influence …by losing employees

Fighting to attract and retain the best talent is still important but letting employees go, even in good times, is also beneficial, says a research team led by INSEAD faculty Andrew Shipilov and Frederic Godart.
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Leadership & Organisations

How do you measure success at the top?

Perhaps at no other time in history has CEO compensation come under such scrutiny. What makes these business leaders, who are more often than not men, worth so much money?

Career

Smart economics: investing in working women

Working women make up a fast-growing percentage of the global workforce, which is now estimated at 46 per cent of the total. In emerging markets, most working women are self-employed, earning low and irregular incomes.

Career

Diversity in the workplace

Be it male-female or multi-cultural, diversity is an offshoot of today’s global economy, the workforce more and more reflecting society’s make-up. But with unemployment having increased since the economic crisis, corporate diversity targets - in the developed world, at least- are in jeopardy, with the remaining workforce left largely unmotivated, disillusioned, and prepared to jump ship at the next job offer. How can companies cope? And can maintaining workforce diversity be an asset or a liability to the bottom line in this environment?

Leadership & Organisations

Why MBAs should not sign the Harvard Business School oath

Harvard MBAs have proposed that all MBA students sign an oath. The oath can be found on http://mbaoath.org/take-the-oath. It pledges, among other things, to “contribute to the well-being of society” and to “create sustainable economic, social and environmental prosperity worldwide.” I don’t believe that this is a good idea, for three reasons. First, some parts of the pledge are inconsistent with fiduciary duties and ethical standards. Second the oath is a misplaced response to the financial crisis. Third, I don’t believe in pledges as an instrument to guide people’s behaviour.

Leadership & Organisations

Why an MBA oath?

Business schools have become an easy target as the butt of jokes about the causes of the current economic crisis. A recent segment on ‘The Daily Show,’ an American satirical television programme, explored the theme of MBAs being to blame for the crisis and the MBA oath as a possible remedy. Its presenter feigned surprise that not all students were willing to sign up to an oath that said: “I will act with utmost integrity and pursue my work in an ethical manner.” No doubt the view that MBAs would have difficulty in making such a commitment is more widespread and yet it seems such a straightforward commitment to make. So in answer to the question, ‘why an MBA oath?’, one response surely must be: ‘Why not?’ Why should it be so difficult for MBAs to commit to behaving ethically?

Career

Human capital: the challenges facing Asia

While the economic downturn is a key focus for many C-level executives, the need to attract and retain talent remains an important issue. This is all the more so in Asia where developing countries such as China and India are helping to drive the world’s economic recovery.

Economics & Finance

Bridging the Chinese talent gap

Despite making huge economic strides in the last three decades, China is still wanting in the area of human capital. Not enough local talent is being adequately groomed to keep up with the country’s growth engine.

Leadership & Organisations

The leadership diversity puzzle

They say it’s never a bad time to invest in leadership. But is that still true, even during the worst economic downturn since the Great Depression? Unilever, the food and personal care products giant, thinks so and is putting its money where its mouth is.

Leadership & Organisations

Why women mean business

Business leaders ignore gender issues at their peril. That's the view of CEO of gender consultancy 20-First and INSEAD alumna Avivah Wittenberg-Cox. In a new book, 'Why Women Mean Business', Wittenberg-Cox and her co-author Alison Maitland say organisations that become savvy about 'womenomics' will win in the war for the best talent and leadership and the war for customers.

Leadership & Organisations

The leadership circle

“Leaders get the best out of followers and followers get the best out of leaders,” says Manfred Kets De Vries, Clinical Professor of Leadership Development at INSEAD. The connection between leaders and their staff is only one of many circular connections he sees.

Career

Facilitating upward communication

Oftentimes, what separates good leaders from bad ones lies is their art of communication. Much has been said about preferred leadership styles which advocate openness, tolerance and active engagement with subordinates.

Career

Improving organisations through performance feedback

Performance feedback plays an important role in indicating when a firm needs to change its management strategy. It doesn’t, however, indicate just what this new strategy should be, and firms do not always respond appropriately, says Henrich Greve, INSEAD Professor of Entrepreneurship and Organisational Behaviour.
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