Skip to main content

Economics & Finance

Sort by:

Economics & Finance

U.S. Elections Comments

Barack Obama has won a second term as President of The United States. How will he handle domestic issues and foreign policy over the next four years? INSEAD Professors Theo Vermaelen, Charles Galunic, Douglas Webber, Pushan Dutt, Amine Ouazad, and Gianpiero Petriglieri share their thoughts.
2 comments

Economics & Finance

The Competitiveness Challenge of European Manufacturers: The Case of Michelin

Michelin has done it all. It was the innovator of the radial tire, which the world is still driving on today; Michelin’s tires are very frequently voted the best tires by authoritative consumer surveys around the world; its Bidendum man brings smiles to young and old and is one of the best known brands around the world; Michelin was the single supplier of tires to the Space Shuttle during the entire life of the space program; and Chefs in restaurants around the world aspire to get a star from the same Michelin company. Michelin has set the standard for several decades.

Economics & Finance

Nobel Prize for a Noble Cause – Under Threat

A good friend of mine, formerly a high-level civil servant in the European Commission’s delegation in Washington, typically begins lectures on the EU by recounting how he was once asked by the person sitting next to him in a domestic flight in the US where he worked. When he replied, ‘I work for the EU’, his neighbour asked him: ‘The EU – is that an insurance company?’

Economics & Finance

How a Scandinavian Firm can teach The World on how to use Social Media inside their Organizations

Andrew Shipilov

When we discuss about European competitiveness, there is often gloom and doom thinking about European non-competitiveness. We believe that such thinking conveys an over-pessimistic picture of Europe’s competences in many aspects of business. In this short text, we want to focus on European managerial competence and to underscore that there are executives in Europe who are exceptionally good at managing both the hard and the soft aspects of management to achieve competitive advantage.

Economics & Finance

Google and France (and Europe)

Today, the French government announced that it will introduce legislation requiring Google to pay a fee to French media sites for listing their content pages. Google promptly responded that in this case it will stop listing French media sites in his search queries. CNN’s report on the conflict can be read here: http://money.cnn.com/2012/10/21/technology/google-french-links/index.html?iid=obinsite.

Economics & Finance

Merger Control and Practice in the BRIC Countries vs. the EU and the US: The Timing

Karel Cool

By Philippe Ombregt, Karel Cool, Nicolas Harlé Mergers or acquisitions are often the preferred way to enter rapidly growing geographies such as the BRIC countries. Also, domestic companies in these geographies frequently use M&A’s to challenge foreign entrants or to become a player with global ambitions. Without surprise, the number of M&A’s in the BRIC countries exploded during the last decade. We documented in a first article “Merger control and practice in the BRIC countries vs. the EU and the US: The facts”, that the number of M&A’s in the BRIC countries increased more than twenty-fold between 2001 and 2011, from 346 to 7654. This is equivalent to about half the number of M&A’s in the EU or the US in 2011; it stood at roughly a twentieth in 2001.

Economics & Finance

China’s Africa Policy

In 2009, China overtook the U.S. as Africa’s prime trade partner. It happened because China substituted the export of revolution for development at home. Mao died with few friends. Now China has many.
4 comments

Economics & Finance

Austerity Hurts. But Does It Work?

A former British Chancellor of the Exchequer fears we may be confusing pain with gain.
1 comment

Economics & Finance

China Finds Bargains in Germany

German engineering companies have become a prime target for Chinese investment. But it’s a mixed blessing.
3 comments

Economics & Finance

Africa Means Business: Opportunities in Frontier Markets

According to the IMF, from 2000 to 2010, six of the world’s ten fastest-growing economies were in sub-Saharan Africa and the forecast for the next five years is even more optimistic. What does this mean for global businesses? How can global MNCs carve out a stake and identify opportunities in Africa’s growth story?

Economics & Finance

CNOOC-Nexen: Global Resources Landscape Shifts Eastward

China’s bid for Canadian energy company Nexen Inc. ignited worldwide debate over China’s perceived ambitions. What do we deduce from China’s largest-ever foray abroad?
1 comment

Economics & Finance

Could Women’s Rights be Sacrificed for Peace in Afghanistan?

The eventual withdrawal of NATO troops from Afghanistan raises fears of what will happen next? Afghanistan’s female MP, Shinkai Kharokhail, hopes women won’t lose their hard-won gains.

Economics & Finance

Making car manufacturing sane: Business Model Innovation at Volkswagen

After a brief hiatus due to vacations and travel over summer, the Renaissance Innovator blog is back! While I was catching up on the stack of journals which accumulated over summer, a Fortune article about Volkswagen which describes transformation of the company from a local German producer to a global phenomenon with over €160B in sales caught my eye. Volkswagen has quietly passed General Motors and Toyota last year to become the largest automotive maker in the world. So what is its secret?

Economics & Finance

Merger Control and Practice in the BRIC Countries vs. the EU and the US: Review Thresholds

Karel Cool

Written by Nicolas Harlé, Philippe Ombregt and Karel Cool With more than 90% of global GDP growth coming from the rapidly developing economies,[2] companies from around the world are targeting these markets for future expansion. The BRIC (Brazil-Russia-India-China) cluster has been a major magnet as it represents about 25% of global GDP and over 60% of global growth.

Economics & Finance

Banksters: The scandals continue

Four years into the economic crisis, a Harris poll of U.S. adults in 2012 found that 70 percent believed “most people on Wall Street would be willing to break the law if they believed that they could make a lot of money and get away with it”. Despite efforts to regulate better behaviour in banking, there is ample evidence that little has changed.