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The Fuel for Kindle’s Fire: Ecosystem Strategy

Ron Adner

The most viable rival to Apple’s iPad isn’t produced by a traditional hardware firm. Where Samsung, Motorola, Toshiba, HP, RIM and HTC have hardly made a dent in Apple’s dominance, it is online retailer Amazon with its Kindle Fire tablet, that has emerged as the lead contender.

Entrepreneurship

Apple’s New iPad: Power and Temptation

One of the most important changes in the new iPad is not visible: they are not all the same. So-called “tear-down” reports from reporters taking them apart and analyzing the components have shown that Apple is getting some key components from multiple suppliers. Early reports indicate three different suppliers for displays and flash memory chips, for example. This is different from earlier versions of the iPad, which relied more on single sources for its components.

Entrepreneurship

SXSW: INSEAD @ South by Southwest

The 2012 edition of the South by Southwest conference (SWSX) wrapped up in Austin last week. Over the last years, this has become one of hottest stops on the startup circuit, earning a reputation as the biggest breeding ground for new ideas and creative technologies– notably, both foursquare and twitter catapulted to the big leagues after they presented early versions at SWSX.

Entrepreneurship

Innovating Presidential Elections: What Can one Learn from the Russian Experience?

Recent presidential elections in Russia have drawn worldwide attention over the last few months. There was, however, one aspect of elections which did not receive as much coverage in the western press (at least in my opinion).

Entrepreneurship

Boeing 787 Dreamliner: Success through a new Manager?

The Boeing 787 Dreamliner program is getting a new manager, Larry Loftis, who is the current manager of the highly successful 777 program. It is hard to be surprised at a change in management of this program, which delivered its first aircraft 3 year behind schedule and has been plagued by design and manufacturing problems. The latest one was discovered one month ago. It makes sense that a project in trouble should have a new manager, and that this new manager should have a track record of success. That’s the way to fix problems, isn’t it?

Entrepreneurship

What is the “best” way to innovate?

MIT Sloan Management Review just came out with the latest 2012 picks for the world’s most innovative companies. This is a great list which includes 50 very interesting companies (mostly young) in a number of industries. While I enjoyed reading about these innovative companies, I could not help but be once again disappointed with the exclusive focus on product and technology innovators on the list and the lack of Business Model Innovators.

Entrepreneurship

Transfer, Promote, or Hire? It Depends on whether you Need Performance Soon

A while ago I saw that Wall Street Journal reported an increase in formal programs for lateral transfers in US corporations, including majors such as Intel. The description of these programs looked sufficiently similar to the job rotation of Japanese firms that I started wondering whether employment practices somehow swam across the Pacific when no one was looking: US firms are starting job rotation just as Japanese firms are starting outside hiring.

Entrepreneurship

How Disposable Tissue Turned into the New Art Form

Any marketer understands the importance of product differentiation. One CEO with an interest in art went one step further and developed a luxury fashion item in the least likely of market sectors: toilet paper.

Entrepreneurship

Where are the jobs? A UK perspective

Unemployment is rampant. One million youths out of work. Where will the new jobs come from? The answer to this question comes in two parts: the Good News and the Bad News.

Entrepreneurship

Dark Shirts and Symbolic Management

One of the most recent news stories on Apple features a picture of CEO Tim Cook addressing an audience dressed in a dark shirt. It made me look twice because I initially thought he was wearing the same kind of turtleneck sweater made famous by Steve Jobs (and designed by Issey Miyake).

Entrepreneurship

Making Cars Electric, One Country at a Time

Not that long ago, I talked about one of the most interesting startups I know of, an Israeli company called Better Place, which has the promise to accomplish what 170 years of technology innovation failed to achieve. What I am talking about is the elusive dream of electric vehicles and the constant struggle of word’s best scientists to combat two basic issues with electric vehicles: the range anxiety and the high cost of batteries.
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Entrepreneurship

Foxconn, Avestin, and Organizational Boundaries

The news last week included two stories that present dilemmas for the companies involved, and are good illustrations of how the boundaries of organizations are becoming difficult to draw in the modern economy.

Entrepreneurship

INSEAD wins top global case study award

Marketing Case Study of Portugal’s Renova Black Toilet Paper is #1

Entrepreneurship

Rank and Risk among Traders

News are coming out that some banks are reducing bonuses for their employees or even invoking clawback clauses (taking back bonuses already given) because of low financial results, or even results that needed to be re-stated because of losses unknown at the time.

Entrepreneurship

The Henry Ford of Cardiac Surgery

Cardiac surgery is a sophisticated, dangerous and delicate procedure; but an Indian surgeon and his hospital group have successfully transformed it into a factory style mass operation, bringing high quality care to the many millions who could never before afford it. Dr. Devi Shetty’s Bangalore based flagship, 1,000-bed Narayana Hrudayalaya Hospital, charges $2,000, on average, for open-heart surgery, compared with hospitals in the U.S. that are paid between $20,000 and $100,000, depending on the complexity of the surgery.
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