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Responsibility

Meeting the sustainability challenge: HCL Technologies

Corporate India is just as committed as Europe and the United States to sustainability, asserts Vineet Nayar, CEO of HCL Technologies Ltd.

Responsibility

Scarcity and innovation: Powering the developing world

Scarcity of resources, scarcity of political consensus and scarcity of financing for innovation. These are some of the major challenges faced by companies in today’s global environment. That’s according to Leif Beck Fallesen, editor-in-chief and CEO of the Danish publication Dagbladet Borsen. Fallesen was the moderator of the first plenary session at the INSEAD Leadership Summit. He said these concerns are highlighted by a growing food crisis (wheat prices rose more than oil prices last year), climate change and decreased foreign investment (down by 9 per cent).

Responsibility

Intel’s Craig Barrett

INSEAD Knowledge

The United States will need to improve its capacity to innovate if it wants to maintain its economic position in the world, says Craig Barrett, Chairman of Intel Corporation. Furthermore, government must make R&D more of a priority, as should private industry.

Entrepreneurship

Winning with value

Too many companies focus on just the cost of software systems, rather than look at the business value they generate. That may not be surprising given the complexities of trying to assess the value of software assets, but according to a new study by INSEAD professor Soumitra Dutta, companies who do this are taking the easy way out.

Entrepreneurship

How the leadership team’s experience can enhance strategy and performance

Hakan Ener, a PhD candidate in strategy at INSEAD, comes from Turkey where there is an abundance of entrepreneurial firms. “My family runs an entrepreneurial business in textiles, so I drew on personal experience when looking at research that would interest me.”

Entrepreneurship

Using externally-oriented can prove a winning strategy

Henrik Bresman

Good teams can often fail when it comes to innovation. That’s the message from a new book by INSEAD Assistant Professor Henrik Bresman and MIT Professor Deborah Ancona. The reason such teams fail is not because of a lack of talent or they can’t work together, but because they don’t take into account external stakeholders and conditions.

Entrepreneurship

The innovation value chain

Innovation isn’t all about great ideas. INSEAD Professor of Entrepreneurship Morten Hansen and visiting professor Julian Birkinshaw argue that companies often fail because they don’t recognise that innovation is a chain that requires strength at every link to succeed.

Strategy

Cost innovation and the dragons

‘Cost innovation’ sounds like an oxymoron. Most of us associate innovation with greater functionality and sophistication. Mainland Chinese companies, however, are turning conventional business models on their heads and these ‘dragons’ are making inroads into markets in ways that would have been unimaginable just a few years ago.

Entrepreneurship

Entrepreneurship: Use symbols to attract resources

Fresh entrepreneurs face the same problem when starting out on their own: “When you are relatively young, with relatively little experience, and you are relatively poor, and you have an unproven new idea, what do you have to do to convince powerful and rich people to give you the first hundred thousand pounds so you can start developing your products?” says INSEAD Associate Professor of Strategy Quy Nguyen Huy. The answer is to pay attention to ‘symbolic management’ at the very earliest stages of a new venture.
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Entrepreneurship

Global information technology: The rankings

Denmark has topped the rankings for the first time in the annual Global Information Technology Report, followed by Sweden, Singapore and Finland. According to the report, Denmark’s outstanding levels of networked readiness are closely tied to the country’s excellent regulatory environment, coupled with clear government leadership and vision in leveraging information and communication technology (ICT).

Entrepreneurship

The China market: Windows of opportunity

Foreign firms have been eyeing the Chinese market ever since the country began opening up in the 1980s. And given that China has a population of about 1.2 billion people, it’s a market that has plenty of promise. However, former INSEAD Assistant Professor of Asian Business and Comparative Management, Steven White, believes that foreign firms may find it difficult to compete with their Chinese counterparts. He points to the way mainland mobile phone companies quickly overtook multinationals such as Motorola, Nokia and Ericsson within just a few years.

Marketing

Create the right sort of buzz about your products

INSEAD Knowledge

How important is word of mouth, more popularly known as buzz, for the success of your new products? Some companies rely on product placement in movies or the endorsement of a sports star or pop singer to help create a buzz about their particular brand. But according to INSEAD Professor of Marketing, Amitava Chattopadhyay, companies may have more control than they previously thought possible regarding the buzz about their new products – they just have to take a more systematic approach.

Entrepreneurship

Technological innovation in the Middle East

When you think of the regions of the world that are pushing ahead with technological innovation, you would not necessarily think of the Middle East straightaway. But according to a recent global innovation index, countries there are starting to make a name for themselves in tech circles.