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Selling soap to Nigeria: One Indian conglomerate goes beyond

India is the darling of investors looking to benefit from the rapid growth of emerging markets. But well-established Indian companies are looking for growth, too, and they are finding it in the developing world.

Marketing

Credit Rating Agencies

Last week has been rich in news about Credit Rating Agencies (CRAs). Both the Financial Times (March 23, 2012) and The Economist (March 17, 2012) had articles on CRAs commenting on how the industry is being reshaped after the scandals triggered by the global credit and fiscal crises. I have followed this industry for over a decade now but I keep being surprised how little progress has been achieved in fixing it.

Economics & Finance

Benefit from the networks of your lost employees

Andrew Shipilov

Is losing employees bad for your firm? An intuitive answer would be a straight “yes” because by losing employees, your organisation seemingly loses not only its human capital (i.e. their skills and tacit knowledge accumulated over the years) but also its social capital (i.e. all the internal and external connections your employees have made over their career inside your firm). In other words, conventional wisdom suggests that by losing employees, companies lose both brains and address books. This idea is out of date.

Marketing

Would You Buy an iPhone Because Apple “Creates” American Jobs?

A couple of days ago Apple released some numbers of how many jobs it creates in the United States. And that number is close to half a million. Apart from the 47,000 jobs “at Apple”, there are about 250 thousand engineering, sales, logistics and service jobs that created by the mere existence of Apple. Plus Apple claims that it creates 200 thousand jobs that can be ascribed to the “iOS app economy”. Check here for the data and Apple’s view.

Marketing

Marketing is context

In 2007 The Washington Post carried an astonishing article describing a social experiment the newspaper had conducted. The Post had asked Joshua Bell to play in the Washington metro during the morning rush hour. As the newspaper describes it, “No one knew it, but the fiddler standing against a bare wall outside the Metro in an indoor arcade at the top of the escalators was one of the finest classical musicians in the world, playing some of the most elegant music ever written on one of the most valuable violins ever made….in a banal setting at an inconvenient time, would beauty transcend?”

Entrepreneurship

How Disposable Tissue Turned into the New Art Form

Any marketer understands the importance of product differentiation. One CEO with an interest in art went one step further and developed a luxury fashion item in the least likely of market sectors: toilet paper.

Marketing

Are Telecom service providers social networks?

My recent interaction with Telecom service providers has been frustrating – to say the least. Telecoms face the very typical situation of declining industry life cycle. Their revenue model is “fee for service” and the service is becoming a commodity. They are under intense pressure to become more efficient in their traditional business, which makes it hard for them to concentrate on revolutionary change in their business models. In essence they spend all their energy on process innovation instead of business model innovation.

Entrepreneurship

INSEAD wins top global case study award

Marketing Case Study of Portugal’s Renova Black Toilet Paper is #1

Marketing

A modest diagnosis of India’s infrastructure woes

I just got back from Hong Kong, and on the way back I stopped in India, as I usually do.

Marketing

Facebook’s value again

My colleague, Hernan Bruno did a great job (see https://blog.insead.edu/2012/02/what-does-a-100bn-valuation-for-facebook-mean/) estimating Facebook’s value from data broadly available on the company as well as sensible assumptions about growth, retention, discount rates and other relevant parameters.

Marketing

What does a $100bn valuation for Facebook mean?

If you follow financial or technology news, you’ve probably already read plenty of stories about Facebook going public. You know about all the Facebook millionaire (or billionaire!) employees, its financials, its mission to “connect” the world, and the unusual degree of control that Mark Zuckerberg will hold. My colleague Miklos Sarvary has two very good posts on the INSEAD blog here and here, putting Facebook’s dominance and valuation into the general context of social media and advertising.

Marketing

Marketing lessons from the financial crisis

The saying “Success has many fathers, but failure is an orphan” goes back at least as far as Tacitus (around 100 B.C.). So calling the financial crisis of 2008 a financial crisis, has the benefit of finding at least one father for that failure: the field of finance, and its real-world embodiment, Wall Street.

Marketing

Facebook on The Economist’s frontpage

It is quite remarquable to see Facebook on the front page of The Economist. As usual there is some good data presented on Facebook’s crazy growth over the last 5 years. The simple explanation provided for this success is ‘network effects’, which are well-known for creating market dominance by only one leading firm (the so-called ‘winner-take-all’ outcome). We have seen this before with Microsoft dominating the OS market or Intel winning on the market of microprocessors.

Marketing

GAFA, the new face of marketing

It is a misconception that the dominant businesses of Silicon Valley are technology companies. Sure, when you think of the venerable old names such as Intel and HP, semiconductor chips and hardware based on those chips come to mind. But just as the 1980s saw the Valley shift to software, and in the 1990s the Valley rode the internet boom, the present century has so far been about consumers and marketing.

Marketing

Are business school rankings good for you?

Whether you’re a prospective student, a recruiter, or a donor, use business school rankings with caution.
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