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Responsibility

some advice to climate scientists on ethics

Climate scientists from the Climate Research Unit (CRU) at the University of East Anglia have come under fire for alleged data manipulation following the release of thousands of emails and documents. As a result of ‘Climategate’, some of the climatologists involved have stepped aside or are under investigation by their university.

Responsibility

Incubation support for India’s social entrepreneurs

Huge social issues exist in India, from health to poverty to illiteracy. New ideas and socially-conscious leaders are desperately needed to develop these ideas into sustainable solutions. Social entrepreneurs – those who bring an entrepreneurial approach to solving social problems – are a growing breed in India. Often they need help during the first few years of inception which would speed up the progress of their project, and ultimately the social impact they want to make.

Responsibility

What’s next after Copenhagen?

Was there too much riding on the United Nations Climate Change Conference which concluded in Copenhagen at the weekend?

Responsibility

Copenhagen: what should investors be demanding?

The outcome of the Copenhagen climate conference may have disappointed some business leaders and may not be the ‘Global Deal’ that many, including the UK’s Carbon Trust, had been hoping for, but it is being touted as another small step forward in the long process towards reducing carbon emissions.

Responsibility

INSEAD initiatives seek to foster growth in Africa

Listen to INSEAD faculty, alumni and associates talk, and you realise that Africa is no longer just a story of disease, poverty, misery and humanitarian aid. Or of China’s hunger for raw materials and energy, while the Japanese and Koreans buy land in Africa to grow their own food. Today, Africa is also a story of investment and growth on a global scale.

Responsibility

A nuclear renaissance

In an age of dwindling natural resources and expanding economies, more countries are turning to nuclear power. According to Mark Fitzpatrick, Senior Fellow for Non-proliferation at the International Institute for Strategic Studies in London, not since the Cold War has there been such renewed interest in nuclear -- though this time, the agenda is different.

Responsibility

Clean energy boost

E+Co is not what you would call a typical investment company. For starters, it’s not a large company with a huge amount of capital. Second, it’s focused exclusively on energy and third, it invests in only small and growing clean energy businesses from developing countries.

Responsibility

Mapping out the challenges for social innovation research

Social entrepreneurs and enterprises may have limited resources but they’re resourceful and are capable of tackling failed markets, as well as intractable ‘wicked’ problems. But the key question, according to Pamela Hartigan, Director of Skoll Centre for Social Entrepreneurship at Said Business School, Oxford University, is how far can social innovation help forge a new global order that is more sustainable, responsible, and humane than what has gone before?

Responsibility

Vision entrepreneurs: helping the poor to get back to work

Eyeglasses have been around for at least 800 years. Yet hundreds of millions of people in the developing world still suffer poor vision, degrading their ability to learn and work, which affects their livelihood.

Responsibility

Healthcare: at the crossroads

Shellie Karabell

Healthcare reform today is being avidly discussed in political, social, medical and business circles around the world. In developing countries, the billions of dollars spent on containing the spread of HIV/AIDS and other pandemic diseases such as TB and malaria, are beginning to show some positive results. In Europe, the cost of government-sponsored healthcare is having a negative impact on GDP, while in the US, the Obama Administration is embarking on the country’s most ambitious attempt at providing universal coverage for some 47 million plus people in the country without health insurance.

Economics & Finance

Green Technology: China Means Business

A substantial portion of the Chinese government’s stimulus package, more than a third in fact, has been earmarked for projects that would either, directly or indirectly, have a positive environmental impact. Are these green initiatives indicative of a broader strategic stance on the part of the Chinese government on environmental issues, or just a temporary boost to China’s economy and the country’s image?

Responsibility

Fairtrade coffee farmers battle for survival in Colombia

On the hillsides of Riosucio in the Caldas State of Colombia, 62-year-old Edwardo Antonio is one of over 400 Fairtrade coffee farmers. Owning three hectares of land, Antonio used to make a nominal income working as a labourer on large coffee plantations. In the early 1990s, his community of mostly indigenous farmers was given the opportunity to work for themselves and taught how to grow and process world-class coffee sought after by buyers such as Starbucks and Equal Exchange.

Responsibility

The social entrepreneur: getting results where angels fear t

What do Richard Branson and Mother Theresa have in common? They have both been agents for change. But when you put them together, you get - the social entrepreneur. It’s a concept and occupation that has been further clarified in new work being done by INSEAD Assistant Professor for Entrepreneurship, Filipe Santos.

Responsibility

On Adam Smith, Gordon Gecko and controls on self-interest

Maybe it’s due to technology, maybe the global economy or maybe the revelations about corporate behaviour as one company after another, melting down and asking for taxpayer aid, laid bare the truth behind their balance sheets. Layman and businessman alike have come to realise that the old taboos surrounding ways of behaviour in the business world no longer work – or perhaps worked inefficiently at best.

Responsibility

Profits with principles: being socially responsible can pay

For the sake of the environment, you shouldn’t wash your jeans each time you wear them; you should wait until you’ve worn them two or three times. This somewhat unusual advice comes courtesy of John Anderson, President and CEO of jeans maker Levi Strauss & Co, a company promoting itself as a socially responsible corporation that supports environmental and humanitarian causes.