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Michael Schaerer

Michael Schaerer

Biography

Michael Schaerer is an Assistant Professor at Singapore Management University. He received his PhD from INSEAD.

Michael is interested in the psychological principles that govern organizational behaviour in hierarchically differentiated environments. Michael's research is primarily driven by two underlying questions: a) How do people in powerless positions think, feel, and behave in the workplace? and b) How can organizational decision makers effectively manage the effects of social hierarchies? Michael's work contributes to research on judgment and decision making, negotiation, and teams, and helps inform how powerlessness and hierarchical differentiation affect individual, interpersonal, and group-level outcomes. Michael previously worked as a strategy consultant at The Boston Consulting Group and holds a master's degree from The London School of Economics and a bachelor's degree from the University of St.Gallen.

Latest posts

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Strategy

Negotiators Should Decrease Concessions Across Rounds

K. S. Tey, R. Swaab, M. Schaerer, N. Madan

Signalling your bottom line reduces your counterparty’s ambitions.

Leadership & Organisations

How Managers Self-Sabotage When Giving Negative Feedback

Michael Schaerer & Roderick Swaab

Communication gaps between managers and their employees widen when delivering criticism.

Strategy

Imagine Alternatives to Negotiate More Ambitiously

M. Schaerer, M. Schweinsberg, R. Swaab

Mentally simulating an attractive alternative can provide some of the advantages that real alternatives typically offer.
1 comment

Leadership & Organisations

The Four Horsemen of Negotiator Power

Michael Schaerer, Adam Galinsky, Joe Magee

To maximise their success at the bargaining table, negotiators should maximise their power.
2 comments

Leadership & Organisations

When Price Precision Pays in Negotiations

Depending on who you are negotiating with, your offers should be more or less precise.

Leadership & Organisations

Negotiating Deals From a Position of Powerlessness

When you are negotiating a deal it pays to have viable alternatives to fall back on – or at least that’s what most people think. New research suggests that being powerless can be liberating and help you achieve better deals.
1 comment